We Will Return in the Whirlwind: Black Radical Organizations 1960-1975

We Will Return in the Whirlwind: Black Radical Organizations 1960-1975

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Author/Contributor(s): Ahmad, Muhammad ; Bracey, John
Publisher: Charles Kerr
Date: 03/01/2007
Binding: Paperback
Condition: NEW

‰ÛÏThis book is dedicated to all freedom and liberation fighters of African descent, past, present, and future, and to all our friends and allies: the freedom-loving people of the world.‰۝
- Muhammad Ahmad

Dr. Muhammad Ahmad was national field chairman of the Revolutionary Action Movement (RAM) during the mid-1960s and founder of the African People‰۪s Party in the 1970s. He has worked closely with Malcolm X, Jesse Gray, Amiri Baraka, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), James and Grace Lee Boggs, James Forman, Robert and Mabel Williams, and Queen Mother Audley Moore, among others, in founding and carrying out various Black liberation projects and organizations. In 1968 he helped organize the Third National Black Power Conference, and co-chaired its political workshop. He has consistently worked to build a Black united front. Now in his sixties, he is a member of N/COBRA and teaches in the department of African American Studies at Temple University in Philadelphia.

‰ÛÏAt last we have a major assessment of some of the important Black radical organizations of the 1960s by one of the major figures involved. Muhammad Ahmad (Maxwell Stanford, Jr.) has given us a study of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Black Panther Party (BPP), the Revolutionary Action Movement (RAM), and the League of Revolutionary Black Workers (LRBW) that only he could have done. Drawing upon his extensive network of personal and political contacts and his unique understanding of the connections between persons, organizations, and events (too often viewed in isolation), Ahmad has made a significant contribution toward deepening our understanding of a period whose complexities might otherwise be lost to future generations.‰۝
- From the Introduction by John Bracey